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Version: 3.x

Native Mini Program Project Using Taro

Partial use of Taro in native projects has been supported since 3.0.25.

Sample Project:#

taro-blended

Basic Hybrid Usage#

App Entry#

1. Packaged in mixed mode#

Use the -blended argument when compiling the project to output mixed-mode code.

taro build --type weapp --blended
taro build --type weapp --watch --blended

2. Move the output directory of the Taro project to the native project#

It is possible to write a Taro plugin for automatic movement, see plugin-mv

3. Referencing the Taro entry file in the native project's app.js#

app.config.js
// the entry file of the Taro project must be referenced
const taroApp = require('./taro/app.js').taroApp
App({
onShow () {
// Optionally, call the onShow lifecycle of the Taro project app
taroApp.onShow()
},
onHide () {
// Optionally, call the onHide lifecycle of the Taro project app
taroApp.onHide()
}
})

Referencing JS files from native projects#

Sometimes we need to reference public js modules in the native project in the Taro project, such as the reported sdk, but Webpack packages these public modules together, resulting in two copies of the public module (one in the Taro product and one in the native project).

To optimize package size, we want to not package into Taro products, but instead reference code directly from the native project, which can be done using Webpack's externals configuration.

Example#

Assume the following project structure:

├── miniapp Natvie Project
| └── utils
| └── util.js
└── taro-project Taro Project
└── src
└── pages
└── index this page need miniapp/utils/util.js
  1. Configure alias to make it easier for externals to filter out dependencies that don't need to be packaged.
  2. Configure Webpack externals to select the dependencies that do not need to be packaged and calculate the relative paths.
  3. Set the environment variable process.env.NODE_ENV to production for externals to take effect. (When no environment variable is set manually, the default environment variable is development in watch mode, otherwise it is production)
config/index.js
const config = {
alias: {
// The development environment directly references the dependencies under the native project for easy development
'@/utils': process.env.NODE_ENV === 'production' ? path.resolve(__dirname, '../utils') : path.resolve(__dirname, '../../miniapp/utils')
},
mini: {
webpackChain (chain) {
chain.merge({
externals: [
(context, request, callback) => {
const externalDirs = ['@/utils']
const externalDir = externalDirs.find(dir => request.startsWith(dir))
if (process.env.NODE_ENV === 'production' && externalDir) {
const externalDirPath = config.alias[externalDir]
const res = request.replace('@/utils', path.relative(context, externalDirPath))
return callback(null, `commonjs ${res}`)
}
callback()
},
]
})
}
}
}
taro-project/src/pages/index/index.js
import { logSomething } from '@/utils/util'
logSomething()
webpack Packing results
{
"./src/pages/index/index.jsx": (function(m, e, __webpack_require__) {
var _utils_util = __webpack_require__("@/utils/util");
// ...
}),
"@/utils/util": (function(module, exports) {
module.exports = require("../../../utils/util");
})
}

Referencing native components of native projects#

Sometimes we need to reference a public custom component in a native project in a Taro project.

As with referencing the native project's js file, we want to resolve the component paths correctly in the development environment and reference the native project components directly in the production environment instead of repackaging them, which can be done using Taro's alias configuration to achieve this.

Example#

Assume the following project structure:

├── miniapp Natvie Project
| └── components
| └── title
| ├── index.js
| ├── index.wxml
| ├── index.wxss
| └── index.json
└── taro-project Taro Project
└── src
├── components Copy the components from the native project so that the development environment can parse the components correctly
| └── title
└── pages
└── index You want to refer to miniapp/components/title in this page
  1. Copy the components from the native project to the Taro project so that the development environment can resolve the components correctly.
  2. Configure alias correctly according to the development environment and production environment.
config/index.js
const config = {
alias: {
'@/components': process.env.NODE_ENV === 'production' ? path.resolve(__dirname, '../components') : path.resolve(__dirname, '../../miniapp/components')
}
}
taro-project/src/pages/index/index.config.js
export default {
usingComponents: {
title: '@/components/title/index'
}
}

Subpackage some pages of the Taro project#

Subpackage some pages of the Taro project.

Dependency Segmentation#

By default, Taro will package common dependencies shared by pages into common.js and node_modules dependencies into vendor.js.

However, when subpackaging, we will want to package only dependencies that are common to the subpackage into the subpackage, rather than hitting common.js and vendor.js in the main package. This requires us to subdivide the dependencies, which can be done with Webpack's splitChunk and Taro's [addChunkPages](. /config-detail#miniaddchunkpages) to do this.

Example#

Assume the following project structure:

├── dist
| |── common.js Public Dependence
| |── vendors.js node_modules Dependence
| └── subPackages
| ├── foo
| ├── bar
| └── common.js Only public dependencies used in subPackages subpackages
└── src
└── subPackages
├── foo
└── bar
  1. Use Webpack splitChunks to package the dependencies unique to only the subpackages subpackage into subpackages/common.js.
  2. Use Taro addChunkPages configuration to add references to subpackages/common.js in the headers of all pages in the subpackage.
config/index.js
const config = {
mini: {
addChunkPages (pages) {
pages.set('subpackages/bar/index', ['subpackages/common']),
pages.set('subpackages/foo/index', ['subpackages/common'])
},
webpackChain (chain) {
chain.merge({
optimization: {
splitChunks: {
cacheGroups: {
subpackagesCommon: {
name: 'subpackages/common',
minChunks: 2,
test: (module, chunks) => {
const isNoOnlySubpackRequired = chunks.find(chunk => !(/\bsubpackages\b/.test(chunk.name)))
return !isNoOnlySubpackRequired
},
priority: 200
}
}
}
}
})
}
}
}

Taro project as a complete subcontract#

Using#

1. Installing and using the plugin#

Installing Plugins @tarojs/plugin-indie

npm i @tarojs/plugin-indie --save-dev

Using plugin

config/index.js
const config = {
plugins: [
'@tarojs/plugin-indie'
]
}

2. Packaged in mixed mode#

Use the -blended argument when compiling the project to output mixed-mode code.

taro build --type weapp --blended
taro build --type weapp --watch --blended

3. Move the output directory of the Taro project to the native project#

It is possible to write a Taro plugin for automatic movement, see plugin-mv

4. Set the subcontract configuration for the native project#

Splitting Taro projects into multiple subcontracts#

Suppose we have a Taro project with page A and page B. We need to add page A to one of the native project's subpackages, M, and page B to another subpackage, N. To do this, we first need to configure Webpack's output.jsonpFunction to avoid conflicts with chunkid.

To do this, unlike normal typing a subpackage, you first need to configure Webpack's output.jsonpFunction configuration to avoid chunkid conflicts.

config/index.js
config = {
// ...
mini: {
webpackChain (chain) {
chain.merge({
output: {
// can be dynamically modified with npm script and environment variables
jsonpFunction: process.env.JSONP_NAME || "webpackJsonp"
}
})
}
}
}

Then package the A and B pages separately using mixed mode, in the same way as Taro project as a complete sub-package.

Compile Taro components as native custom components#

v3.1.2+, only React is supported for now

Taro supports compiling components into native mini program custom components for use in native projects.

Usage#

1. Configuring Component Paths#

Modify app.config.js to add components configuration, pointing to the path of the component entry file.

app.config.js
export default {
// ...
components: [
'pages/index/index',
'components/picker/index'
]
}

2. Start compiling#

Use the taro build native-components command with the parameter type to compile a custom component for the corresponding platform.

taro build native-components --type [platform] [--watch]

Pass props#

When passing props to the native custom components compiled by Taro, they need to be passed uniformly via the props parameter.

page/index/index.js
Page({
data: {
pickerProps: {
mode: 'format',
value: [0, 0, 0],
onInitial (value, index) {
console.log('onInitial')
}
}
}
})
page/index/index.wxml
<!--index.wxml-->
<view>
<picker props="{{pickerProps}}"></picker>
</view>
Taro Component - Picker
function Picker ({ mode, value, onInitial }) {
return (
// ...
)
}